• me: buys ten new books
  • me: re-reads harry potter


nottonksandlupinyoubitch:

darlinghogwarts:

UH GUYS? x

FOUND A THING! FOUND A THING! FOUND A THING8


deathlyhellos. turned 3 today!

I know we’re not as active as we used to be, but we still appreciate each and everyone one of you! Thanks for following these three years. Harry Potter forever!


Okay, okay, I’m going to tell you what Hermione sees in Ron.

A trio is a balancing act, right? They’re equalizers of each other. Harry’s like the action, Hermione’s the brains, Ron’s the heart. Hermione has been assassinated in these movies, and I mean that genuinely—by giving her every single positive character trait that Ron has, they have assassinated her character in the movies. She’s been harmed by being made to be less human, because everything good Ron has, she’s been given.

So, for instance: “If you want to kill Harry, you’re going to have to kill me too”—RON, leg is broken, he’s in pain, gets up and stands in front of Harry and says this. Who gets that line in the movie? Hermione.

“Fear of a name increases the fear of the thing itself.” Hermione doesn’t say Voldemort’s name until well into the books—that’s Dumbledore’s line. When does Hermione say it in the movies? Beginning of Movie 2.

When the Devil’s Snare is curling itself around everybody, Hermione panics, and Ron is the one who keeps his head and says “Are you a witch or not?” In the movie, everybody else panics and Hermione keeps her head and does the biggest, brightest flare of sunlight spell there ever was.

So, Hermione—all her flaws were shaved away in the films. And that sounds like you’re making a kick-ass, amazing character, and what you’re doing is dehumanizing her. And it pisses me off. It really does.

In the books, they balance each other out, because where Hermione gets frazzled and maybe her rationality overtakes some of her instinct, Ron has that to back it up; Ron has a kind of emotional grounding that can keep Hermione’s hyper-rationalness in check. Sometimes Hermione’s super-logical nature grates Harry and bothers him, and isn’t the thing he needs even if it’s the right thing, like when she says “You have a saving people thing.” That is the thing that Harry needed to hear, she’s a hundred percent right, but the way she does it is wrong. That’s the classic “she’s super logical, she’s super brilliant, but she doesn’t know how to handle people emotionally,” at least Harry.

So in the books they are this balanced group, and in the movies, in the movies—hell, not even Harry is good enough for Hermione in the movies. No one’s good enough for Hermione in the movies—God isn’t good enough for Hermione in the movies! Hermione is everybody’s everything in the movies.

Harry’s idea to jump on the dragon in the books, who gets it in the movies? Hermione, who hates to fly. Hermione, who overcomes her withering fear of flying to take over Harry’s big idea to get out of the—like, why does Hermione get all these moments?

[John: Because we need to market the movie to girls.]

I think girls like the books, period. And like the Hermione in the books, and like the Hermione in the books just fine before Hollywood made her idealized and perfect. And if they would have trusted that, they would have been just fine.

Would the movies have been bad if she was as awesome as she was in the books, and as human as she was in the books? Would the movies get worse?

She IS a strong girl character. This is the thing that pisses me off. They are equating “strong” with superhuman. To me, the Hermione in the book is twelve times stronger than the completely unreachable ideal of Hermione in the movies. Give me the Hermione in the book who’s human and has flaws any single day of the week.

Here’s a classic example: When Snape in the first book yells at Hermione for being an insufferable know-it-all, do you want to know what Ron says in the book? “Well, you’re asking the questions, and she has to answer. Why ask if you don’t want to be told?” What does he say in the movie? “He’s got a point, you know.” Ron? Would never do that. Would NEVER do that, even before he liked Hermione. Ron would never do that.

— Melissa Anelli THROWS IT DOWN about the way Ron and Hermione have been adapted in the movies on the latest episode of PotterCast. Listen here. This glorious rant starts at about 49:00. (via princejaron)

celestial-sexhair:

sararye:

justarandomturtle:

we’re here to fuck shit up.

ron looks like he is ready to kill someone but very confused why

I feel like the above statement is a very good summary of ronald weasley


Emma Watson for Wonderland Magazine


teaburger:

The three different kinds of exam takers.

#in which i am harry


  • Everyone: HARRY NO
  • Harry: HARRY YES

mallardaise:

JK Rowling's bestselling boy wizard is due for a makeover, with the launch of award-winning illustrator Jim Kay's fully-illustrated edition of Harry Potter in 2015.

The first in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, is slated for publication in September 2015, and publisher Bloomsbury will release each of the subsequent titles annually, re-creating the original publishing schedule which started in London in 1997, and so successfully developed readers as they, and Harry and friends, grew older together.

Illustrator Kay has reimagined Harry for a new generation of readers, in a style that nods to Daniel Radcliffe’s portrayal of the boy wizard in the film versions of the novels, and captures the character of Harry in the books.”

[X]


wintry-mix:

success-is-my-goal:

ronnieisnotamazing:

SO HE WAS HOT THE WHOLE TIME AND WE JUST DIDN’T KNOW IT.

WHAT

Citizens of the world, we have been deceived.


  • Snape: What would three young Gryffindors such as yourselves be doing inside... on a day like this?
  • Hermione: Uh... Well... We... We were just...
  • Snape: You ought to be careful. People will think you're...
  • Harry: 
  • Ron: 
  • Hermione: 

  • Harry: 
  • Ron: 
  • Hermione: 
  • Snape: ...Up to something.

simplypotterheads:

Today marks the 12th anniversary of the theatrical release of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Debuting on the scene with mostly positive critical acclaim, the first installment in the massive Potter film franchise went on to make over $974 million worldwide, and is the 18th highest-grossing film of all-time.

But that’s not why it’s amazing.

As Potterheads, we can remember quite well seeing the Privet Drive sign slide into focus onscreen for the first time and our hands gripping whatever was closest because this was it, it was really happening: Harry’s world was being brought to life. And it was just as magical as we imagined it would be. If you have time, pop the film in for nostalgia’s sake. You can never walk down Diagon Alley or ride the boats across the Black Lake to Hogwarts too many times.


the-absolute-best-posts:

unelanabolvangar:

can we just agree that hermione doesn’t give two shits about throwing rocks in the water. she knows exactly what she’s doing bless her